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Showing posts from 2019

Buying Another Guitar Maker's Wood Cache

A good rule is to buy as much as you can sensibly afford of any wood that excites you and then, quickly, buy a little more.

James Krenov, The Fine Art of Cabinetmaking, 1977

I received a call from a gentleman the other day asking if I would come to his house and start the appraisal of a classical guitar that his late son built in 2012. It turned out that his son was John Weissenrieder, an American guitar maker who moved to Florence, Italy and learned to make guitars under the tutelage of the Italian maker, Andrew Tacchi.

Mr. Weissenrieder asked me to appraise the guitar because he wants to loan it to the classical guitar program at University of Colorado, Boulder, so a young guitarist can have the chance to play a wonderful guitar that can help them grow as a musician. Nicolo Spera, who is head of the program, had referred me to Mr. Weissenrieder, several of Professor Spera's students own and play guitars that I made.

When I arrived at Mr. Weissenrieder's house, I was shown tw…

My Tool Sharpening Kit

Just as sharpness can mean different things to different woodworkers, so too the ways in which we go about getting tools sharp are different.

James Krenov, The Fine Art of Cabinetmaking, 1977

Sharpening, for me, is something that should be fast and easy. Over the last 25 years or so, I have tried and used several different sharpening mediums - Carborundum stones, wet/dry sandpaper on plate glass,  Japanese style water stones, etc., etc., - some worked for me, some didn't.



My sharpening system now consists of three different grit diamond sharpening stones, a vintage Eclipse sharpening jig, newsprint paper with green and jeweler's rouge honing compounds.





The iron on my Stanley No.5 jack plane needed sharpening. I use the traditional sharpening angle of 25 degrees on this iron, and yes, I have used the "15 degree only" angle, back bevels and micro-bevels, but the angles that are recommended in the woodworking books from the turn of the 20th century work best for me. I d…