Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Workbench Tote

I do not know when the open wooden tool box came into general use.

Roy Underhill, The Woodwright's Work Book, 1986



If you own copy of The New Traditional Woodworker, by Jim Tolpin, then perhaps you have constructed his workbench tote project.

My workbench is always a mess and now that I am getting to the finishing stage for two classical guitars, I thought I would try to mend my ways and keep a tidy bench. A workbench tote is a start in the right direction.



I held fairly close to the dimensions in Tolpin's book, but used some nice pine that was on hand (I think it is lodgepole pine, it's hard to find good ponderosa pine these days) for the sides and handle, with pine plywood for the bottom.

A carpenter by trade, I decided to build this tote in the house carpenter tradition, nothing fancy, just 45 degree miters, a table saw cut groove for the plywood...



...glue and pin nails from a trim gun to hold everything together.



The tote handle shape is a personal decision, you don't have to copy anyone's design, make it look the way you want it to look.



Boring the holes for the handle made me realize that I need to spend some time sharpening my augers!



It is a tote for the workbench, so the handle is held in place with trim nails - rulers, chisels and gauges aren't heavy enough to warrant larger fasteners.

It's not as fancy as the one in The New Traditional Woodworker, but it was a fun, quick project.

I save the fancy work for my guitars,


you know, something like this!

Now, get out in your shop and make something!

Here's a video of Stephanie Jones, enjoy!



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